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See Coronavirus Restrictions and Mask Mandates for All 50 States

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Masks
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Stay-at-home orders
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A year after much of the country entered strict lockdowns designed to contain the coronavirus, it remains largely up to state and local officials to determine what restrictions, if any, to impose to slow new infections.

A nationwide patchwork of rules for businesses and residents has resulted from months of trial and error, as governors have reopened some sectors only to later re-close and reopen them again as infection rates rose and fell.

Many states are moving closer to lifting all restrictions now that the vaccine rollout is underway. Others are still mandating the use of masks in public and keeping other limits in place.

Coronavirus restrictions by state

The New York Times is tracking coronavirus restrictions at the state level, including what businesses are open or closed — and whether officials require masks or recommend or order staying at home. Stricter local orders may also be in place, and local conditions may not always reflect state requirements.

Many states offer exceptions to broader rules, for example allowing bars to operate if they also serve food. Nearly all states limit capacity or require social distancing measures for businesses that are allowed to open.

This page will be updated regularly.

Businesses mostly open Masks not required
Gov. Kay Ivey, a Republican, ended the Safer at Home Order and issued a Safer Apart Order, effective April 9. Individuals are no longer required to wear masks, but are strongly recommended to wear them in public places. The order will be effective through May 5. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining, bars and breweries
Personal care
Salons
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Entertainment venues
Outdoor and recreation
Beaches; gyms
Businesses mostly open Masks not required
In February, the state’s emergency declaration expired, ending the few mandated restrictions. Gov. Mike Dunleavy, a Republican, replaced the mandates with advisories. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; bars
Personal care
Hair salons, barbershops, nail salons, etc.
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Libraries; theaters; bowling alleys; museums
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms; pools
Some businesses closed Masks not required
Gov. Doug Ducey, a Republican, allowed bars to resume normal operations and lifted local mask mandates, starting March 25. Mr. Ducey ordered schools to reopen for in-person classes by March 15, or after spring break. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; bars
Personal care
Barbershops, salons, etc.
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Casinos; movie theaters
Outdoor and recreation
Pools, spas; gyms
Businesses mostly open Masks not required
Gov. Asa Hutchinson, a Republican, lifted the statewide mask requirement starting March 30 but said that businesses still have the right to ask customers to wear masks. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; bars
Personal care
Hair salons, barbershops, nail salons, etc.
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Theaters, stadiums, museums, bowling alleys; casinos; large venues
Outdoor and recreation
Campgrounds; gyms; pools
Some businesses closed Masks mandatory Advised to stay home
Gov. Gavin Newsom, a Democrat, will increase outdoor gathering limits and will allow indoor live events, beginning April 15. Rules will vary according to the county risk tiers. Mr. Newsom announced that risk tiers and business restrictions will be lifted June 15 if hospitalization levels are low and vaccine supply is sufficient. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail
Food and drink
Indoor dining in most counties
Personal care
Personal care services in some counties; hair salons and barbershops; personal care services
Houses of worship
Houses of worship in most counties
Entertainment
Small amusement parks in some counties; museums, zoos and aquariums in most counties; movie theaters in most counties
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms in most counties
Industries
Movie, television and music production
Closed
Food and drink
Bars
Some businesses closed Masks sometimes required
Gov. Jared Polis, a Democrat, allowed counties to implement regulations at the local level while keeping mask requirements and restrictions on large gatherings in place. Mr. Polis extended the Health Order through mid-May. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; bars in most counties
Personal care
Salons and personal services
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Museums, indoor events; libraries; museums; indoor events and entertainment
Outdoor and recreation
Campgrounds; pools, playgrounds
Industries
Offices; manufacturing
Some businesses closed Masks mandatory
Gov. Ned Lamont, a Democrat, announced that state parks can return to providing full service and beaches can open for swimming for the summer. Mr. Lamont signed a bill to relax restrictions on outdoor dining through March 2022. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores, malls
Food and drink
Restaurant dining
Personal care
Hair salons, barbershops; nail salons; tattoo parlors, spas
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Museums, zoos; casinos; movie theaters; libraries; bowling alleys; indoor performance venues; amusement parks; indoor stadiums
Outdoor and recreation
Beaches; gyms; state campgrounds
Industries
Offices
Closed
Food and drink
Bars
Businesses mostly open Masks mandatory Advised to stay home
Gov. John Carney, a Democrat, increased outdoor gathering limits to 150 people, starting April 1. Mr. Carney also removed a mask requirement for outdoor low-risk and medium-risk youth sport competitions and practices. The restrictions will be extended through mid-May. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores; malls
Food and drink
Farmers markets; restaurants; bars
Personal care
Barber shops, hair salons, tanning salons; nail salons, tattoo parlors, massage therapy
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Museums, libraries, galleries, live performances; casinos
Outdoor and recreation
Beaches; pools; gyms; campgrounds
Businesses mostly open Masks not required
Gov. Ron DeSantis, a Republican, has limited the rights of local governments to enforce restrictions tighter than the state’s, and has touted his role in keeping businesses open. Most recently, Mr. DeSantis issued an order prohibiting businesses from requiring that patrons provide proof of Covid-19 vaccination. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; bars
Personal care
Salons; tattoo parlors, massage therapy, tanning salons, acupuncture
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Museums, libraries; movie theaters, concert halls, bowling alleys; sporting venues
Outdoor and recreation
Beaches, trails; gyms
Businesses mostly open Masks not required
Gov. Brian Kemp, a Republican, issued a new order in late March which rolled back restrictions on businesses and gatherings. The new order, effective April 8, removes a ban on gatherings and a shelter-in-place requirement for medically fragile residents. Distance requirements at restaurants, bars, gyms and other businesses were also reduced. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail
Food and drink
Restaurant dining
Personal care
Hair salons, barbershops, etc.
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Bowling alleys; theaters, private social clubs; large venues; bars, nightclubs
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms
Some businesses closed Masks mandatory
Each of Hawaii’s major islands has varying restrictions. Most recently, Gov. David Ige, a Democrat, allowed the city and county of Honolulu to continue to operate under the less restrictive Tier 3 guidelines through April, despite an increase in cases. Nightclubs remain closed in many areas. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail
Food and drink
Bars in some areas; restaurant dining
Personal care
Pet groomers; tattoo parlors; salons and barbershops; nail salons
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Theaters
Outdoor and recreation
State parks in some areas; campgrounds in some areas; gyms; pools and waterparks; beaches and parks
Industries
Offices in some areas
Businesses mostly open Masks not required
Gov. Brad Little, a Republican, moved the state to Stage 3 of its reopening plan in early February, allowing nightclubs to reopen and expanding the gathering limit to 50 people. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; bars
Personal care
Hair salons
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Movie theaters; large venues; nightclubs
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms; pools and water parks
Businesses mostly open Masks mandatory
Gov. J.B. Pritzker, a Democrat, announced in March that capacity limits could be relaxed once 70 percent of seniors in the state are vaccinated, and removed altogether once 50 percent of residents 16 and up are vaccinated, assuming other metrics remain stable. Though 70 percent of seniors have now received at least one shot, rising hospitalization rates have prevented the state from meeting all of the metrics required to relax restrictions. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurants; bars
Personal care
Pet grooming; hair salons, barber shops, nail salons, spas, waxing centers, tattoo parlors
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Theaters; museums; casinos
Outdoor and recreation
State parks; limited fishing, boating, golf courses; gyms
Industries
Manufacturing; offices
Businesses mostly open Masks not required
Gov. Eric Holcomb, a Republican, lifted a statewide mask mandate on April 6, replacing it with an advisory. Masks are still required in state buildings, vaccination sites and K-12 schools. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; bars and nightclubs
Personal care
Spas, salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Libraries; museums, zoos and aquariums; venues; movie theaters; bowling alleys; conventions, fairs, parades and similar events
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms; pools, tennis and basketball courts; campgrounds; amusement parks, water parks
Industries
Manufacturing, offices
Businesses mostly open Masks not required
Gov. Kim Reynolds, a Republican, removed a statewide mask mandate, along with certain gathering restrictions, in February. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores, malls
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; bars
Personal care
Medical spas, tanning salons; salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors, etc.
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Libraries; movie theaters; museums, zoos, aquariums; casinos; outdoor venues; bowling alleys, amusement parks; indoor venues
Outdoor and recreation
Campgrounds; gyms; pools; playgrounds, skating rinks, skate parks
Businesses mostly open Masks not required
Early efforts to curtail the emergency powers of Gov. Laura Kelly, a Democrat, resulted in decisions about restrictions being left up to individual counties. Ms. Kelly issued a statewide mask mandate in July, but counties were allowed to opt out of the order under state law. On April 1, Ms. Kelly re-issued the mask order, but the new order was quickly overturned by state lawmakers. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; bars
Personal care
Salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Theaters, museums and bowling alleys; casinos; nightclubs
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms; community centers, sports facilities; pools
Industries
Offices
Businesses mostly open Masks mandatory Advised to stay home
Gov. Andy Beshear, a Democrat, announced in April that he would remove capacity restrictions and distancing requirements for most businesses once 2.5 million Kentuckians have received at least one dose of a Covid-19 vaccine. A 1 a.m. curfew currently in effect for bars and restaurants will also be lifted if the vaccination goal is met. Most businesses are currently allowed to operate at 60 percent of capacity. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Distilleries; indoor dining; bars
Personal care
Pet grooming and boarding; salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors, etc.
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Movie theaters; bowling alleys; museums, aquariums, libraries, outdoor attractions; venues and events spaces
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms; aquatic centers; campgrounds; public pools
Industries
Manufacturing, construction, offices
Businesses mostly open Masks mandatory
In late March, Gov. John Bel Edwards, a Democrat, said he would further relax restrictions, removing capacity limits on restaurants and bars, salons, gyms and shopping malls. A statewide mask mandate will remain in place. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Malls
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; bars
Personal care
Salons and barbershops; spas, tattoo parlors
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Movie theaters; museums, zoos and aquariums; casinos; event centers
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms; state parks; pools; bowling alleys, skating rinks
Businesses mostly open Masks mandatory
Gov. Janet Mills, a Democrat, unveiled a new reopening plan in March which would gradually relax certain restrictions ahead of summer tourism season. Bars were allowed to reopen for indoor service on March 26, while gathering limits were relaxed to 50 percent indoors and 75 percent outdoors. Restrictions are set to be relaxed again in May. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurants; bars
Personal care
Hair salons, barbershops, pet groomers; nail salons and tattoo parlors; spas and massage parlors
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Amusement parks, water parks; bowling alleys and arcades; movie theaters; performing arts venues; casinos
Outdoor and recreation
State parks, boating, golf courses; remote campgrounds, hunting and fishing; private campgrounds; gyms
Businesses mostly open Masks mandatory
Gov. Larry Hogan, a Republican, lifted capacity restrictions on a number of businesses, including restaurants and bars, retail stores, gyms, religious facilities, salons, and recreational facilities in March. Indoor and outdoor venues, like theaters and concert venues, are limited to 50 percent of capacity. A statewide mask mandate remains in place. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores; malls
Food and drink
Restaurants; bars
Personal care
Hair salons, barbershops; nail salons, massage parlors, tanning salons, tattoo parlors
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Casinos; movie theaters; live entertainment venues
Outdoor and recreation
Beaches; gyms
Industries
Manufacturing; construction, offices
Businesses mostly open Masks mandatory
Gov. Charlie Baker, a Republican, allowed the state to move into Step 1 of Phase 4 on March 22, allowing large stadiums and arenas to open at 12 percent of capacity. Public gathering limits were allowed to increase to 100 individuals indoors and 150 outdoors, though private residential gatherings remain capped at 10 indoors and 25 outdoors. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining
Personal care
Hair salons, barbershops; pet grooming; nail salons, massage parlors, tanning salons
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Bowling alleys; museums, aquariums; outdoor theaters and performance venues; movie theaters; casinos; arcades; indoor performance venues; skating rinks, laser tag, trampolines and obstacle courses; large stadiums and arenas; exhibition and convention halls
Outdoor and recreation
Golf courses; beaches, parks, fishing, hunting and boating; gyms; indoor ice rinks
Industries
Construction, manufacturing; offices; hotels, lodging
Closed
Food and drink
Bars
Businesses mostly open Masks mandatory
Amid a surge in cases, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer urged residents in April to avoid indoor dining and social gatherings, but stopped short of enacting new restrictions. The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services extended for five weeks an order limiting business capacity and requiring face masks. Starting April 26, the face mask order will include children aged 2 to 4. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Indoor dining; bars
Personal care
Pet groomers; hair salons, barbershops, nail salons, tattoo parlors
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Bowling alleys; casinos; movie theaters; theaters; performance venues; arcades; amusement parks
Outdoor and recreation
Golf courses, marinas; pools; gyms
Industries
Construction, real estate; manufacturing, including auto companies; offices
Closed
Entertainment
Night clubs
Businesses mostly open Masks mandatory
Gov. Tim Walz, a Democrat, announced an easing of several restrictions beginning March 15. Indoor dining may now operate at 75 percent of capacity, while gyms and entertainment venues may increase to 50 percent. Salons and houses of worship may operate at full capacity. Social gathering limits were also increased to 15 people indoors and 50 outdoors. Starting April 1, seated indoor venues could host up to 3,000 people, while seated outdoor venues could host up to 10,000. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores; malls
Food and drink
Restaurants; bars; theaters; concert halls; movie theaters; bowling alleys, arcades
Personal care
Salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors
Houses of worship
Outdoor and recreation
Campgrounds; gyms; pools
Industries
Manufacturing; offices
Businesses mostly open Masks not required
Gov. Tate Reeves, a Republican, removed nearly all restrictions, including county-based mask orders that applied to most of the state, in early March. Mr. Reeves relaxed one of the few remaining requirements in late March, allowing indoor arenas to increase to 75 percent of capacity. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining, bars
Personal care
Salons and barbershops; tattoo parlors
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Casinos; movie theaters; libraries, museums
Outdoor and recreation
State parks; gyms
Businesses mostly open Masks not required
Gov. Mike Parson, a Republican, reopened all businesses in early May, with social distancing rules, and later lifted all restrictions. Mr. Parson has touted the lack of statewide mandates in Missouri, though some cities, like St. Louis, have enacted their own restrictions. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining
Personal care
Salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Movie theaters, music venues; casinos
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms; campgrounds
Businesses mostly open Masks not required
Gov. Greg Gianforte, a Republican, rolled back restrictions put in place by former Gov. Steve Bullock, a Democrat. Limits on business capacity and gatherings were lifted in January, while a statewide mask mandate was allowed to expire on Feb. 12. Mr. Gianforte issued an order in April which prohibits businesses in the state from requiring patrons to provide proof of vaccination from Covid-19. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining, bars, breweries and distilleries
Personal care
Salons, barbershops, massage parlors
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Museums, movie theaters; concert venues; bowling alleys; casinos
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms
Businesses mostly open Masks not required
Gov. Pete Ricketts, a Republican, announced that the state would move to the "green" phase on the state's color-coded restriction system in late January, removing the few remaining capacity limits on businesses. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; bars
Personal care
Salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors, etc.
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Zoos, movie theaters, libraries and venues
Outdoor and recreation
Pools; gyms
Businesses mostly open Masks mandatory
Gov. Steve Sisolak, a Democrat, announced that starting May 1 he will end statewide social distancing requirements, and that decisions about mitigation measures will be turned over to counties. Mr. Sisolak also announced a goal of reopening business capacity to 100 percent in all counties by June 1. A statewide mask mandate will remain in effect. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores; malls
Food and drink
Restaurants; bars
Personal care
Barbershops, hair salons and nail salons; massage therapy; tattoo and piercing shops
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Museums, art galleries, zoos and aquariums; movie theaters, bowling alleys; gaming
Outdoor and recreation
Golf courses, pickleball, tennis courts; state parks; gyms; pools and water parks
Businesses mostly open Masks not required
Gov. Chris Sununu, a Republican, further relaxed restrictions in March, allowing retail businesses to operate at 100 percent of capacity. Mr. Sununu announced he would allow a statewide mask mandate to expire on April 16. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining
Personal care
Barbershops, hair salons; nail salons; tanning salons; tattoo shops; acupuncturists and massage therapists
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Libraries, museums, art galleries; bowling alleys and entertainment centers; movie theaters; amusement parks; live performances
Outdoor and recreation
Golf courses; outdoor attractions; beaches; gyms; pools
Businesses mostly open Masks mandatory
Gov. Phil Murphy, a Democrat, allowed restaurants, personal care services and gyms to increase occupancy to 50 percent of capacity on March 19. On April 2, the limit on outdoor gatherings was increased to 200 individuals, though the limit on indoor gatherings remains at 25. Capacity limits were also loosened for large venues. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores; malls
Food and drink
Restaurant dining
Personal care
Hair salons, barbershops; nail salons, tattoo parlors, spas, massage therapy, tanning salons
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Casinos; playgrounds, water parks, amusement parks; museums, libraries, aquariums; bowling alleys, batting cages, shooting ranges; indoor amusement facilities; movie theaters and other indoor entertainment venues
Outdoor and recreation
Golf courses; beaches; campgrounds; pools; gyms
Industries
Construction
Some businesses closed Masks mandatory Advised to stay home
Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham, a Democrat, introduced a tiered system for imposing restrictions by county in early December. Twenty of the state’s 33 counties are now in the least-restrictive turquoise tier, meaning most businesses can operate at 75 percent of capacity. No counties are in the most restrictive tier. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail
Food and drink
Outdoor dining; bars in some counties; indoor dining
Personal care
Hair salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors, massage parlors, nail salons
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Bowling alleys; aquariums; amusement parks; arcades; movie theaters in some counties; concert venues in some counties; museums
Outdoor and recreation
Golf courses, pools, zoos, state parks; gyms; ice skating rinks
Businesses mostly open Masks mandatory
Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo, a Democrat, has relaxed a number of restrictions on businesses and gatherings. A curfew for restaurants and bars will be moved one hour later, from 11 p.m. to midnight, starting April 19. Schools and colleges will be allowed to hold indoor and outdoor graduation ceremonies at limited capacities starting May 1. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores; malls
Food and drink
Indoor dining
Personal care
Hair salons, barbershops; tattoo parlors, massage parlors, nail salons
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Bowling alleys; museums and aquariums; casinos; stadiums and arenas; movie theaters; pool halls; indoor family entertainment centers; large outdoor performing arts venues; small sports venues; events, arts and entertainment venues; outdoor amusement parks
Outdoor and recreation
Beaches; fishing and hunting; public pools and playgrounds; outdoor zoos, botanical gardens and nature parks; gyms; ski resorts
Industries
Construction, manufacturing; offices; film and television production
Closed
Entertainment
Amusement parks
Businesses mostly open Masks mandatory
Gov. Roy Cooper, a Democrat, further relaxed restrictions in late March. Capacity limits were lifted for retail businesses and salons, while restaurants and gyms were allowed to increase to 75 percent of capacity, and bars and movie theaters could increase to 50 percent of capacity. A restriction limiting late night alcohol sales was also lifted. Gathering limits were increased to 50 people indoors and 100 outdoors. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; bars
Personal care
Salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Museums and aquariums; bowling alleys and skating rinks; large outdoor venues; auditoriums, amphitheaters, arenas and other venues for live performances; movie theaters; amusement parks
Outdoor and recreation
Pools; playgrounds; gyms
Businesses mostly open Masks not required
Gov. Doug Burgum, a Republican, allowed a statewide mask mandate to expire in January. Business restrictions limiting capacity also became recommendations rather than requirements. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail
Food and drink
Restaurant dining, bars
Personal care
Salons, tattoo parlors, massage therapy, etc.
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Movie theaters; music and entertainment venues
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms; sports venues
Businesses mostly open Masks mandatory
Gov. Mike DeWine, a Republican, announced a new health order that encapsulates previous orders regarding mass gatherings, masks and social distancing. The new order eases restrictions on mass gatherings and religious services. Outdoor graduations and festivals are now permitted, but must follow safety guidelines and be limited to ten people per group. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining and bars
Personal care
Salons, barbershops, etc.
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Movie theaters, museums, art galleries; casinos, racinos, amusement parks, water parks
Outdoor and recreation
Campgrounds; gyms, pools, and sports leagues; bowling alleys, miniature golf and batting cages; aquariums, zoos; skating rinks, playgrounds, country clubs
Industries
Manufacturing, distribution, construction; offices
Businesses mostly open Masks not required
Gov. Kevin Stitt, a Republican, updated guidelines for in-person visitation to long-term care facilities, about a year after visitation was first closed. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; bars
Personal care
Salons, barbershops, spas, pet groomers, etc.; tattoo parlors
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Movie theaters, sports venues, museums; nightclubs
Outdoor and recreation
State parks; zoos; gyms
Industries
Offices
Some businesses closed Masks mandatory
One year after schools were ordered to close, Gov. Kate Brown, a Democrat, required all public schools to resume in-person instruction by March 29 for grades K through 5 and April 19 for grades 6 through 12. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Indoor dining in most counties
Personal care
Salons, barbershops
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Museums, theaters in most counties
Outdoor and recreation
Some state parks; gyms in most counties; zoos
Businesses mostly open Masks mandatory
Gov. Tom Wolf, a Democrat, increased capacity for indoor dining and gyms to 75 percent, starting April 4. Mr. Wolf also expanded gathering limits for indoor events to 25 percent of capacity and outdoor events to 50 percent of capacity. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores; shopping malls
Food and drink
Indoor dining
Personal care
Hair salons, barbershops, spas
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Movie theaters, musems, casinos
Outdoor and recreation
Golf courses, marinas, private campgrounds; beaches; state parks; public pools; gyms
Some businesses closed Masks mandatory Stay-at-home order or curfew
Gov. Pedro Pierluisi, a member of the New Progressive Party, modified the existing Health Order by lowering capacity limits on businesses and restaurants to 30 percent. Mr. Pierluisi also announced the enforcement of the negative test requirement for travelers entering the island. The night curfew from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m., the early closure of businesses and the mask mandate will remain in place through May 9. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores; malls
Food and drink
Outdoor dining
Personal care
Salons, barbershops; pet grooming
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Museums; outdoor concerts and other open venues; movie theaters; casinos
Outdoor and recreation
Beaches; gyms; pools; parks
Closed
Food and drink
Bars
Businesses mostly open Masks mandatory Advised to stay home
In mid-February, Gov. Gina Raimondo, a Democrat, allowed bars to reopen and houses of worship to increase occupancy to 40 percent of capacity. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; bars
Personal care
Hair salons, barbershops; nail salons, massage parlors, tattoo shops
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Bowling alleys, theaters, casinos
Outdoor and recreation
State parks; beaches; gyms; casinos; campgrounds; gyms
Industries
Offices; malls
Businesses mostly open Masks sometimes required
Gov. Henry McMaster, a Republican, required nursing homes and assisted living facilities to allow visitation to all residents if there is no high risk of Covid-19 transmission, starting March 19. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; bars
Personal care
Salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors, etc.
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Museums, zoos, aquariums; movie theaters, stadiums, festival parades, racetracks; nightclubs
Outdoor and recreation
Beaches, piers, docks, etc.; gyms; pools; amusement parks, water parks
Businesses mostly open Masks not required
Gov. Kristi Noem, a Republican, announced that she will not order a lockdown or a mask mandate such as those in other states. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining
Personal care
Salons, barbershops
Houses of worship
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms
Businesses mostly open Masks not required
Gov. Bill Lee, a Republican, removed previous gathering limits and restrictions on who can attend school sports effective Feb. 1. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; bars
Personal care
Salons, barbershops, etc.
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Theaters, museums, amusement parks
Outdoor and recreation
State parks; gyms
Businesses mostly open Masks not required
Gov. Greg Abbott, a Republican, lifted the mask mandate and capacity limits on all businesses, starting March 10. Mr. Abbott said that this order ensures that “all businesses and families in Texas have the freedom to determine their own destiny.” Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores, malls
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; bars in most counties
Personal care
Salons, barbershops, etc.; massage services
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Movie theaters, museums, libraries; bowling alleys, bingo halls, skating rinks, rodeos; aquariums; amusement parks; carnivals
Outdoor and recreation
State parks; pools; gyms; water parks; zoos
Industries
Offices, manufacturing
Businesses mostly open Masks sometimes required
Gov. Spencer Cox, a Republican, ended the statewide mask mandate on April 10. Masks are still required for gatherings of 50 or more people and in K-12 schools. Counties and local businesses can issue their own requirements. Mr. Cox condemned threats of violence against employees requiring customers to wear masks. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining
Personal care
Salons, personal care businesses
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Movie theatres, museums, libraries, concerts
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms; pools
Businesses mostly open Masks mandatory
Gov. Phil Scott, a Republican, announced a plan to gradually lift restrictions, starting April 9, on businesses, travel and mass gatherings as more people receive the vaccine. By July 4, all restrictions will become recommendations. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining
Personal care
Hair salons and barbershops; nail salons, spas, tattoo parlors
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Museums, theaters, libraries
Outdoor and recreation
State parks, golf courses, trails, etc.; campgrounds; gyms, fitness centers
Industries
Manufacturing, construction, distribution
Closed
Food and drink
Bars
Businesses mostly open Masks mandatory
Gov. Ralph S. Northam, a Democrat, lifted the night curfew, relaxed limits on outdoor social gatherings to 25 people, and attendance caps for entertainment venues to 1,000 people, starting March 1. Bars and restaurants that sell alcohol may stay open until midnight. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurants and bars
Personal care
Salons, barbershops, etc.
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Museums, zoos, aquariums, outdoor concerts
Outdoor and recreation
Campgrounds; beaches; gyms; pools
Businesses mostly open Masks mandatory
In March, Gov. Jay Inslee, a Democrat, allowed all counties to move to Phase 3 of reopening, and increased indoor capacity limits to 50 percent. In mid-April, three counties were moved back to Phase 2 after surpassing thresholds for cases and hospitalizations. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining
Personal care
Hair salons
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Theaters, museums, bowling alleys
Outdoor and recreation
Outdoor sports; gyms
Businesses mostly open Masks mandatory
Mayor Muriel Bowser will reopen public pools and allow all libraries, museums and retail stores to operate at 50 percent capacity, starting May 1. Also, weddings, graduations and other ceremonies can take place indoors and outdoors with capacity limits. Ms. Bowser announced that all public schools will fully reopen, starting fall 2021. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Indoor dining
Personal care
Barbershops, hair salons; nail salons, waxing salons, spas
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Museums; libraries
Outdoor and recreation
Dog parks, golf courses, tennis courts, parks; gyms; pools
Closed
Entertainment
Nightclubs
Businesses mostly open Masks mandatory
In March, Gov. Jim Justice, a Republican, lifted occupancy restrictions for restaurants, bars, gyms, museums and retail stores, and allowed public gatherings of up to 100 people. Starting May 1, fairs, festivals and summer camps will be allowed to resume. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores; malls
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; bars
Personal care
Salons, barbershops, pet groomers; tanning salons; massage parlors and spas
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Museums, zoos; bowling alleys, pool halls, roller rinks; casinos; movie theaters; amusement parks, fairs, festivals
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms, recreation centers; state parks, campgrounds; pools
Businesses mostly open Masks not required Advised to stay home
Wisconsin’s Supreme Court declared a statewide mask mandate invalid and blocked Gov. Tony Evers, a Democrat, from issuing a new public health order without the state legislature’s approval. In February Mr. Evers had signed an executive order requiring face coverings in public places one hour after the state assembly voted to repeal the same mandate. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurants and bars
Personal care
Hair salons, spas, barbershops
Houses of worship
Outdoor and recreation
State parks; gyms
Businesses mostly open Masks not required
Gov. Mark Gordon, a Republican, removed the statewide mask requirement, effective March 16. Health orders were extended through April 30 and indoor events of more than 500 people can be held at 50 percent of the venue’s capacity. Read more ›
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; bars
Personal care
Hair salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors, massage therapy, etc.
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Movie theaters, entertaiment venues
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms; state parks

Tracking the Coronavirus