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See How the Vaccine Rollout Is Going in Your County and State

Pct. of all residents that are fully vaccinated

20

30

40

50%

No data

Pct. of residents age 18+ that are fully vaccinated

30

40

50

60%

No data

Pct. of residents age 65+ that are fully vaccinated

60

70

80

90%

No data

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Texas Department of State Health Services | Note: No C.D.C. data available for Hawaii, Texas and some counties. Five other states were excluded because more than a quarter of data is missing. *Data from Texas’ health agency excludes shots given by federal agencies and includes 16- and 17-year-olds.

Federal regulators recommended a pause in the use of Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine on April 13 after reports of blood clots in a small number of patients. Johnson & Johnson doses that were already administered or distributed continue to appear in the federal vaccination data.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Sunday about 131.2 million people have received at least one dose of a Covid-19 vaccine, including about 84.3 million people who have been fully vaccinated by Johnson & Johnson’s single-dose vaccine or the two-dose series made by Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna.

The C.D.C. is now reporting people fully vaccinated by county of residence. This data is not available for all states, and is incomplete in others, artificially lowering the published vaccination rates for some counties.

The work to distribute the vaccine comes as more than 566,000 people in the United States have died after contracting the virus.

How Quickly Are Shots Going in Arms?

Providers are administering about 3.19 million doses per day on average. Figures show the date shots were reported, rather than the date shots were given and include first and second doses of Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna, and single doses of Johnson & Johnson.

New reported doses administered by day

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Note: Line shows a seven-day average. Data not updated on some weekends and holidays. Includes the Johnson & Johnson vaccine as of March 5.

President Biden promised to administer 100 million vaccines by his 100th day in office. The United States surpassed that goal, which some said was not ambitious enough, on March 19, almost six weeks ahead of schedule. Mr. Biden has since said he hopes for 200 million doses to be administered by his 100th day, a goal that the nation is already on pace to meet.

In December, federal regulators gave emergency use authorization to vaccines developed by Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna. Both of those vaccines require patients to receive two doses spaced weeks apart. Regulators authorized Johnson & Johnson’s one-dose vaccine in February, but recommended a pause in its use on April 13 because of reports of blood clots in a small number of patients. All 50 states have quickly paused or recommend that providers pause those vaccinations. Johnson & Johnson doses that were already administered or distributed continue to appear in the federal vaccination data.

The federal government has delivered about 264.5 million doses to states, territories and federal agencies.

When Might a Majority of People Be Vaccinated?

Some experts have estimated that 70 to 90 percent of the total population — adults and children — needs to acquire resistance to the coronavirus to reach herd immunity, when transmission of the virus substantially slows because enough people have been protected through infection or vaccination.

A number of factors will determine how quickly this threshold is met, especially the pace at which newly vaccinated people join those who are immune after past infections. But the presence of more transmissible virus variants could complicate that progress. And children, who aren’t yet eligible, may be key to reaching herd immunity, experts say.

The projection below only shows the share of the total population with at least one shot based on the current rate of newly vaccinated people, but it provides a rough indication of when the virus’s spread could begin to stall.

At the current pace of vaccination, everyone could get a shot this year. But no vaccine has been authorized for children under 16.

Based on the seven-day average of people receiving a first or single dose each day.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Note: Total population includes states, territories and three countries with special agreements with the United States: Palau, Micronesia and the Marshall Islands.

Are The Most Vulnerable Counties Being Vaccinated?

Speed isn’t the only priority for the country’s vaccination campaign. The Biden administration has also committed to distributing shots equitably to the communities most affected by the pandemic.

Yet more than three months into the rollout, the most socially vulnerable counties in the U.S. have a lower vaccination rate on average than the nation’s least vulnerable. The majority of the most disadvantaged counties with the fewest fully vaccinated people are in the South, while the most vaccinated, least vulnerable counties are in the Midwest.

Vaccination rates by county social vulnerability

Share of total population fully vaccinated. Circles sized by county population.

WestMidwestNortheastSouth
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Note: No data available for Hawaii, Texas and some counties. Colorado, Georgia, New Mexico, Virginia and West Virginia were excluded because more than a quarter of data is missing.

Counties are ranked according to the Social Vulnerability Index, a C.D.C. indicator used in public health crises that is based on socioeconomic status, housing, transportation, race, ethnicity and language. Each county’s vaccination rate is its share of all residents that have been fully vaccinated, a figure that does not reflect those who have only received one dose of a two-shot vaccine.

How Is Each State Doing?

Some jurisdictions have been more efficient than others at administering their doses from the federal government.

Pct. of all residents given at least one shot

34

38

42%

Pct. of all residents that are fully vaccinated

24

26

28%

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The table below includes states, territories, federal agencies and three countries with special agreements with the United States: Palau, Micronesia and the Marshall Islands.

People receiving the single-shot Johnson & Johnson vaccine are included in counts for those with “at least one dose” and those “fully vaccinated.”

Percent of people
Name Given at least one shot Fully vaccinated Doses delivered Shots given Doses used
U.S. total*U.S. total*

40%

25%

264,505,725

209,406,814

79%

New HampshireN.H.

58%

28%

1,096,375

1,099,300

100%

PalauPalau

50%

45%

24,600

16,544

67%

ConnecticutConn.

49%

32%

3,395,165

2,770,457

82%

MaineMaine

49%

32%

1,144,750

1,007,762

88%

MassachusettsMass.

48%

29%

5,967,370

5,170,513

87%

New MexicoN.M.

48%

32%

1,882,565

1,627,241

86%

VermontVt.

47%

31%

570,360

474,833

83%

New JerseyN.J.

46%

30%

7,169,475

6,269,398

87%

Rhode IslandR.I.

45%

32%

895,785

776,082

87%

CaliforniaCalif.

43%

25%

32,618,010

26,092,008

80%

PennsylvaniaPa.

43%

26%

10,649,235

8,517,810

80%

South DakotaS.D.

43%

31%

802,795

635,646

79%

New YorkN.Y.

43%

29%

16,098,245

13,531,789

84%

MarylandMd.

43%

28%

4,967,520

4,063,087

82%

WisconsinWis.

42%

29%

4,542,495

4,061,288

89%

MinnesotaMinn.

42%

29%

4,194,140

3,787,015

90%

VirginiaVa.

42%

27%

6,777,945

5,673,591

84%

ColoradoColo.

42%

26%

4,515,250

3,790,514

84%

IllinoisIll.

42%

25%

10,246,165

8,189,755

80%

DelawareDel.

42%

26%

818,475

648,557

79%

GuamGuam

41%

25%

140,740

111,474

79%

American SamoaAmerican Samoa

41%

32%

43,810

35,972

82%

Washington, D.C.D.C.

41%

23%

683,975

511,693

75%

IowaIowa

41%

28%

2,481,445

2,102,984

85%

NebraskaNeb.

40%

28%

1,556,360

1,267,986

81%

WashingtonWash.

40%

27%

5,999,170

4,965,443

83%

KansasKan.

40%

26%

2,361,115

1,815,877

77%

AlaskaAlaska

40%

32%

746,705

515,501

69%

HawaiiHawaii

40%

28%

1,269,070

937,276

74%

OregonOre.

39%

25%

3,219,255

2,595,396

81%

KentuckyKy.

39%

28%

3,429,405

2,849,292

83%

MichiganMich.

39%

26%

7,872,710

6,158,414

78%

FloridaFla.

38%

24%

17,807,745

13,397,449

75%

Northern Mariana IslandsNorthern Mariana Islands

38%

29%

62,910

36,062

57%

MontanaMont.

38%

27%

899,445

678,296

75%

North DakotaN.D.

38%

30%

590,480

525,541

89%

OhioOhio

38%

26%

9,214,895

7,339,803

80%

ArizonaAriz.

37%

24%

5,738,495

4,505,745

79%

OklahomaOkla.

37%

26%

3,385,565

2,474,956

73%

NevadaNev.

36%

24%

2,202,110

1,834,497

83%

North CarolinaN.C.

36%

25%

8,309,510

6,244,401

75%

UtahUtah

35%

19%

2,166,920

1,871,243

86%

TexasTexas

35%

22%

21,453,555

16,539,082

77%

West VirginiaW.Va.

35%

27%

1,522,165

1,084,345

71%

South CarolinaS.C.

34%

23%

3,914,045

2,908,640

74%

MissouriMo.

34%

23%

4,715,505

3,508,767

74%

ArkansasArk.

33%

22%

2,370,830

1,611,803

68%

IndianaInd.

33%

23%

4,775,740

3,685,577

77%

GeorgiaGa.

32%

19%

8,033,225

5,462,269

68%

WyomingWyo.

32%

24%

468,615

323,699

69%

IdahoIdaho

32%

23%

1,283,065

974,591

76%

TennesseeTenn.

32%

20%

5,103,860

3,562,769

70%

LouisianaLa.

31%

23%

3,513,250

2,489,654

71%

AlabamaAla.

30%

19%

3,664,740

2,292,276

63%

Puerto RicoP.R.

30%

18%

2,704,620

1,561,390

58%

U.S. Virgin IslandsU.S. Virgin Islands

30%

21%

63,440

56,290

89%

MississippiMiss.

29%

21%

2,246,015

1,466,965

65%

Marshall IslandsMarshall Islands

24%

18%

51,300

24,248

47%

MicronesiaMicronesia

16%

10%

63,200

29,412

47%

Federal agenciesFederal agencies

11,010,960

8,491,992

77%

Dept. of Veterans AffairsDept. of Veterans Affairs

5,960,085

4,650,943

78%

Dept. of DefenseDept. of Defense

3,255,200

2,547,655

78%

Indian Health ServiceIndian Health Service

1,657,885

1,160,071

70%

Bureau of PrisonsBureau of Prisons

137,790

133,323

97%

*Includes doses provided to Palau, Micronesia and the Marshall Islands.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; U.S. Census Bureau | Note: Extra doses in Pfizer vials and data reporting inconsistencies may result in the percentage of doses used adding up to more than 100. Geographically isolated areas such as Alaska, American Samoa, Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands can place orders for multiple weeks at once.

There are many reasons for variation among the states and territories, including demand for the vaccine, lags in data reporting and other logistical challenges.

Who Is Eligible for a Vaccine?

States have moved rapidly in recent weeks to expand eligibility for the vaccine, and several have already made shots available to everyone age 16 and older. Every state has announced plans to make all adults eligible by April 19.

Health care workers and residents of long-term care facilities have been eligible for vaccination in every state for months, and people 65 and older have been eligible for many weeks in most states.

But the details of who is eligible can vary widely from state to state, and even county to county in states that do not have universal eligibility. The Times tracks statewide rules, and adds county-level discrepancies as that information arises.

Who is eligible for vaccines, by age

Every state has started widely vaccinating older adults, though the minimum eligibility age varies across the country.

16+

30+

40+

55+

65+

Eligible only in some counties

Data as recent as April 16.

Sources: State and county health departments.

The tables below, which will be updated regularly but may lag slightly, show who is eligible for vaccination in each state, in addition to health care workers and long-term care residents. In many instances, people may be eligible for a vaccine but unable to make an appointment. And some counties may delay or pause eligibility for certain groups even after a state expands access.

Eligibility by age or health status

All states are vaccinating health care workers and residents of long-term care facilities, and have started expanding eligibility to other groups. Click on a state for more information.

Eligible only in some counties

Location Age High-risk adults Universal adult eligibility date
AlabamaAla. ›

16+

Yes

April 5

AlaskaAlaska ›

16+

Yes

March 9

ArizonaAriz. ›

16+

Yes

March 24

ArkansasArk. ›

16+

Yes

March 30

CaliforniaCalif. ›

16+

Yes

April 15

ColoradoColo. ›

16+

Yes

April 2

ConnecticutConn. ›

16+

Yes

April 1

DelawareDel. ›

16+

Yes

April 6

FloridaFla. ›

16+

Yes

April 5

GeorgiaGa. ›

16+

Yes

March 25

HawaiiHawaii ›

16+

Yes

April 19

IdahoIdaho ›

16+

Yes

April 5

IllinoisIll. ›

16+

Yes

April 12

IndianaInd. ›

16+

Yes

March 31

IowaIowa ›

16+

Yes

April 5

KansasKan. ›

16+

Yes

March 29

KentuckyKy. ›

16+

Yes

April 5

LouisianaLa. ›

16+

Yes

March 29

MaineMaine ›

16+

Yes

April 7

MarylandMd. ›

16+

Yes

April 6

MassachusettsMass. ›

55+

Yes

April 19

MichiganMich. ›

16+

Yes

April 5

MinnesotaMinn. ›

16+

Yes

March 30

MississippiMiss. ›

16+

Yes

March 16

MissouriMo. ›

16+

Yes

April 9

MontanaMont. ›

16+

Yes

April 1

NebraskaNeb. ›

16+

Yes

April 5

NevadaNev. ›

16+

Yes

April 5

New HampshireN.H. ›

16+

Yes

April 2

New JerseyN.J. ›

55+

Yes

April 19

New MexicoN.M. ›

16+

Yes

April 5

New YorkN.Y. ›

16+

Yes

April 6

North CarolinaN.C. ›

16+

Yes

April 7

North DakotaN.D. ›

16+

Yes

March 29

OhioOhio ›

16+

Yes

March 29

OklahomaOkla. ›

16+

Yes

March 29

OregonOre. ›

65+

Yes

April 19

PennsylvaniaPa. ›

16+

Yes

April 13

Rhode IslandR.I. ›

40+

Yes

April 19

South CarolinaS.C. ›

16+

Yes

March 31

South DakotaS.D. ›

16+

Yes

April 5

TennesseeTenn. ›

16+

Yes

April 5

TexasTexas ›

16+

Yes

March 29

UtahUtah ›

16+

Yes

March 24

VermontVt. ›

30+

Yes

April 19

VirginiaVa. ›

16+

Yes

April 18

WashingtonWash. ›

16+

Yes

April 15

Washington, D.C.D.C. ›

16+

Yes

April 12

West VirginiaW.Va. ›

16+

Yes

March 22

WisconsinWis. ›

16+

Yes

April 5

WyomingWyo. ›

16+

Yes

March 31

Data as recent as April 16.

Sources: State and county health departments.

The Times tracks statewide eligibility based on age, occupation and underlying health conditions, and notes states where that information is known to vary by county. The Times also records the date when vaccines became available to all adults in a state, or the future date when state officials expect everyone to be eligible.

When all adults are eligible for the vaccine in each state

Before April

April 1 through April 14

April 15 or later

Data as recent as April 16.

Sources: State and county health departments.

Some states that announce universal eligibility dates may begin booking appointments for all adults before the new rules take effect.

Some state or local governments have imposed additional restrictions on eligibility for certain groups of workers. In some states, for instance, clergy members have been eligible only if they work in health care settings.

Eligibility by occupation

Click on a state for more information.

Eligible only in some counties

Location Grocery workers Food-processing workers Postal workers Restaurant workers Clergy
AlabamaAla. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

AlaskaAlaska ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

ArizonaAriz. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

ArkansasArk. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

CaliforniaCalif. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

ColoradoColo. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

ConnecticutConn. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

DelawareDel. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

FloridaFla. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

GeorgiaGa. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

HawaiiHawaii ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

IdahoIdaho ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

IllinoisIll. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

IndianaInd. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

IowaIowa ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

KansasKan. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

KentuckyKy. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

LouisianaLa. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

MaineMaine ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

MarylandMd. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

MassachusettsMass. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

MichiganMich. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

MinnesotaMinn. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

MississippiMiss. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

MissouriMo. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

MontanaMont. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

NebraskaNeb. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

NevadaNev. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

New HampshireN.H. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

New JerseyN.J. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

New MexicoN.M. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

New YorkN.Y. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

North CarolinaN.C. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

North DakotaN.D. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

OhioOhio ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

OklahomaOkla. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

OregonOre. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

PennsylvaniaPa. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Rhode IslandR.I. ›

Yes

South CarolinaS.C. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

South DakotaS.D. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

TennesseeTenn. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

TexasTexas ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

UtahUtah ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

VermontVt. ›

Yes

VirginiaVa. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

WashingtonWash. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Washington, D.C.D.C. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

West VirginiaW.Va. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

WisconsinWis. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

WyomingWyo. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Data as recent as April 16.

Sources: State and county health departments. | Note: Some state or local governments have imposed additional restrictions on eligibility for certain groups of workers.

All states have expanded their occupation-based vaccination program to include some non-medical workers, beyond teachers, such as bus drivers, who are at risk of being exposed to the virus on the job. Some law enforcement personnel are eligible for the vaccine in every state.

The lists of which professions are eligible have varied widely by state. Childcare workers and teachers from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade are eligible for vaccines in every state.

People with certain medical conditions are eligible for the vaccine in every state, but the qualifying conditions continue to differ from state to state.

About the Data

Data on vaccines delivered and administered comes from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which updates data daily. The C.D.C. began reporting county-level vaccinations on March 26.

Figures include vaccines developed by Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson. People receiving the Johnson & Johnson single-shot vaccine are counted as those with “at least one dose” and those “fully vaccinated.”

The federal data may differ from that reported by states and territories, which may post on different schedules. Providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and it can take additional time for jurisdictions and the C.D.C. to receive this information.

The C.D.C. typically reports data as of 6 a.m. each day. On March 13, the C.D.C. reported about 4.6 million new doses administered, including about 1.6 million doses that were reported after the 6 a.m. cutoff, resulting in a visible spike.

The C.D.C. notes that total doses administered are based on the location where the vaccine was given, and that in limited cases, people might get a vaccine outside of their place of residency. As of Feb. 23, the C.D.C. reports the number of people receiving one or more doses based on where individuals reside.

On Feb. 19, the C.D.C. began including shots given by the federal agencies in each state’s count. Doses delivered to federal agencies were added to state totals on Feb. 20. Some states, including Alaska, North Dakota and Utah, are supposed to receive supplements for tribal governments that have elected to receive their vaccines through the state, rather than through the federal Indian Health Service.

In addition to delivering vaccines to states, territories and some federal agencies, the C.D.C. also distributes doses to three small countries that have special agreements with the U.S. government: Palau, Micronesia and the Marshall Islands.

The C.D.C. also reports state-level data on the number of shots administered to people in nursing homes and long-term-care centers.

Tracking the Coronavirus